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Connection between Human Rights Law and Pregnancy

The Canadian Human Rights Act proscribes any kind of discrimination with regards to pregnancy. Pregnancy-related inequity is considered a type of gender discrimination because only the female gender can conceive and carry a child. Unfair practices towards pregnancy like ill-treatment, denial to empl...

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Can a Negative Employment Reference be Considered Defamation?

A letter of reference from a previous employer usually plays the key role of a determinant of whether the candidate in consideration will bag the job he or she really wants. This is the most prevalent method for recruiters to get an elaborate understanding of a candidate’s potential and to authentic...

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Your Rights on Medical Leave

Everyone gets sick at some time or another, and you shouldn’t have to be worrying about your job when you’re trying to get over a serious illness. That’s why Canadian law provides employment protection for workers on medical leave, and it’s important that you know your rights in what can be a stress...

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A New Minimum Wage in Ontario

Determining the minimum wage in Canada is a provincial responsibility and the minimum amount an employer must pay for an hour’s work varies from province to province. Currently, Alberta is the only province in the country to award a $15 an hour minimum to all workers, but recent changes to the Ontar...

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Municipalities Should Focus on Why over How Much

The Ontario legislature is considering ways to reduce municipal insurance premiums; unfortunately, it may be at the expense of your legal rights. Recently, Julia Munro, PC MPP for York Simcoe, stated that “medium-sized municipalities, similar to the town of East Gwillimbury . . . have seen an averag...

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Ontario Court Looks at Private Facebook Photograph Rules

Personal Injury lawyers may want to change their Examination for Discovery strategy based on the following new cases: Stewart v. Kempster, 2012 ONSC 7236 and Read More

Humpty Dumpty’s Philosophy on Compensatory Damages

Victims get compensatory damages in order to return them back to the same position they were in before the injury. This basic Tort law concept is taught to law students – and it is wrong. Often, victims cannot “return” to their pre-injury condition. The Read More

Ontario Court of Appeals Gives Clarity to “Catastrophic Impairment”

The Ontario Court of Appeals recently clarified the meaning of “catastrophic impairment” under Ontario’s Insurance Act. In Pastore v. Aviva Canada Inc., Mrs. Anna Pastore was a pedestrian who suffered a lot of pain because a car hit her.  Mrs. Pastore applied for enhanced accident benefits due to...

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Ontario’s Superior Court Certifies Class Action Against Rail Companies

The Toronto Star reported that Via Rail’s derailed train victims can proceed with a class action lawsuit against Via Rail and CN Rail.  The victims claim that their train was derailed because it was going over 100 km/hr in a 25 km/hr zone.  As a result, the accident killed 3 engineers and injured 45...

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Law Society of Upper Canada Looks at Articling Reform

As a Canadian studying at an American law school, I envy my American classmates who can sit for the bar after graduation.  Generally, future Canadian attorneys have to complete a 10 month articling position – similar to an apprenticeship.  In the past, this 10 month apprenticeship helped graduates t...

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